Reading scriptures while dating

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Still, there is by no means unanimity among scholars on the subject, some favoring yet other pronunciations, such as “Yahuwa,” “Yahuah,” or “Yehuah.” Since certainty of pronunciation is not now attainable, there seems to be no reason for abandoning in English the well-known form “Jehovah” in favor of some other suggested pronunciation.If such a change were made, then, to be consistent, changes should be made in the spelling and pronunciation of a host of other names found in the Scriptures: Jeremiah would be changed to (as in Greek).Some hold that the name was viewed as being too sacred for imperfect lips to speak.Yet the Hebrew Scriptures themselves give no evidence that any of God’s true servants ever felt any hesitancy about pronouncing his name. Another view is that the intent was to keep non-Jewish peoples from knowing the name and possibly misusing it.Hello World, I don’t know about you but December always seems to fly by…Between making Christmas lists, shopping with the masses, sending out Christmas greetings via e-mail or snail mail, going to Christmas parties and other events, preparing for the New Year and regular life stuff, it seems there is never enough time to do it all and so I almost look forward to January when life is back to its regular pace…

Its use throughout the Scriptures far outnumbers that of any of the titles, such as “Sovereign Lord” or “God,” applied to him. Manley points out: “A study of the word ‘name’ in the O[ld] T[estament] reveals how much it means in Hebrew. (2Ki ) For a Hebrew to tell a Philistine or an Assyrian that he worshiped “God [he means Jehovah.

Just as the reason or reasons originally advanced for discontinuing the use of the divine name are uncertain, so, too, there is much uncertainty as to when this superstitious view really took hold. This theory, however, is based on a supposed reduction in the use of the name by the later writers of the Hebrew Scriptures, a view that does not hold up under examination. This papyrus is dated by scholars as being from the first century B. E., and thus it was written four or five centuries earlier than the manuscripts mentioned previously. The Jewish Mishnah, a collection of rabbinic teachings and traditions, is somewhat more explicit.

Some claim that it began following the Babylonian exile (607-537 B. Malachi, for example, was evidently one of the last books of the Hebrew Scriptures written (in the latter half of the fifth century B. E.), and it gives great prominence to the divine name. Evidence for this date supposedly was found in the absence of the Tetragrammaton (or a transliteration of it) in the Greek (God) for the Tetragrammaton. So, at least in written form, there is no sound evidence of any disappearance or disuse of the divine name in the B. Its compilation is credited to a rabbi known as Judah the Prince, who lived in the second and third centuries C. Some of the Mishnaic material clearly relates to circumstances prior to the destruction of Jerusalem and its temple in 70 C. Of the Mishnah, however, one scholar says: “It is a matter of extreme difficulty to decide what historical value we should attach to any tradition recorded in the Mishnah.

’” (7:5 states that a blasphemer was not guilty ‘unless he pronounced the Name,’ and that in a trial involving a charge of blasphemy a substitute name was used until all the evidence had been heard; then the chief witness was asked privately to ‘say expressly what he had heard,’ presumably employing the divine name.

10:1, in listing those “that have no share in the world to come,” states: “Abba Saul says: Also he that pronounces the Name with its proper letters.” Yet, despite these negative views, one also finds in the first section of the Mishnah the positive injunction that “a man should salute his fellow with [the use of] the Name [of God],” the example of Boaz (Ru 2:4) then being cited.9:5.

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